Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Exhibit at Museum Mensch und Natur, Nymphenburg Palace, Munich, Bavaria Germany

Today about a German Museum, Mensch und Natur ("Human and Nature") located in the famous Nymphenburg Palace in Munich, Bavaria, Germany which I support with my images for a forthcoming exhibit about insects named "Knallbunt und unsichtbar" ("extremely colorful and invisible") which will be shown July 6 - November 4, 2018. It will include works of mine about (simulated) butterfly and bee vision.

[click on image to see a larger one]

Here showing some of the images which will be on display, a Gazania rigens flower, in a Quadriptych of human vision, UV, and simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):

 

This flowers outer petals reflect UV around 365nm, whereas the inner parts are quite darker, hence forming UV nectar guides for UV seeing insects. There are also highly UV reflecting marks inside around a dark UV center, all invisible to us humans but clearly visible to bees and butterflies, and all this gets nicely visible here, especially in simulated bee and butterfly vision.

I'm wishing the museum and its visitors a successful exhibit, certainly worth going to with family and friends!

Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos

Friday, July 6, 2018

Greenpower butterfly exhibit, Kowloon Park, Hong Kong

Today about an organization in Hong Kong, GREENPOWER a charitable institution, which I support with my images for a forthcoming exhibit at Kowloon Park about butterflies. Aside from other environmental issues, they are concerned about Butterflies and would like to show children their beauty and importance, but also that they have abilities, we humans don't have, like being able to see ultraviolet light.

[click on image to see a larger one]

Here showing the images which will be used, a Rudbeckia hirta flower, in a Quadriptych of human vision, UV, and simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):
 

This flower shows a very prominent UV bullseye pattern, as its petal tips are very UV bright (around 365nm) to about the middle and its center is very UV dark, and all this gets nicely visible also in simulated bee and butterfly vision.

I have previously written about butterfly vision HERE

I'm wishing Greenpower and its visitors a successful exhibit, certainly worth going to with family and friends!

Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos

Monday, July 2, 2018

Opuntia humifusa in reflected ultraviolet photography and simulated bee and butterfly vision

Today shots of a decorative plant, a Prickly pear - Opuntia humifusa in reflected ultraviolet photography using my "work horse" UV filter, the Baader-U filter as well as my XBV filters for simulating bee and butterfly vision. Lens was a UV-Nikkor 105mm quartz fluorite lens. Light source was sunlight.

[click on image to see a larger one]

Human vision:
 

Reflected UV:
 

Simulated butterfly vision:
 

Simulated bee vision:
 

Quadriptych of human vision, UV, simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):
 

These Opuntia flowers have a unique UV reflection, In UV the petals have inside a metallic like shine that reflects UV strongly, maybe to attract pollinators. otherwise there is no distinctive UV pattern, and all this gets nicely visible, also in simulated bee and butterfly vision.

I have written about that flower before HERE
 
Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos

Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Biting Stonecrop - Sedum acre in reflected ultraviolet photography and simulated bee and butterfly vision

Today shots of a decorative plant, a creeping Biting Stonecrop - Sedum acre in reflected ultraviolet photography using my "work horse" UV filter, the Baader-U filter as well as my XBV filters for simulating bee and butterfly vision. Lens was a UV-Nikkor 105mm quartz fluorite lens. Light source was sunlight.

[click on image to see a larger one]

Human vision:
 

Reflected UV:
 

Simulated butterfly vision:
 

Simulated bee vision:
 

Quadriptych of human vision, UV, simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):
 

Sedum flowers have a distinct UV reflection, its petals have a quite UV dark center and the outside part is quite UV bright around 365nm and all this gets nicely visible, also in simulated bee and butterfly vision.

I have written about that flower before HERE
 
Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos

Missouri Coneflower - Rudbeckia missouriensis in reflected ultraviolet photography and simulated bee and butterfly vision III

Today shots of another Missouri Coneflower - Rudbeckia missouriensis hybride in reflected ultraviolet photography and simulated bee and butterfly vision. All shots were done at f8 in reflected ultraviolet photography using my "work horse" UV filter, the Baader-U filter, as well as my XBV filters for simulated bee and butterfly vision. Lens was a UV-Nikkor 105mm quartz fluorite lens. Light source was sunlight.

[click on image to see a larger one]

Human vision:
 

Reflected UV:
 

Simulated butterfly vision:
 

Simulated bee vision:
 

Quadriptych of human vision, UV, simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):
 

Missouri Coneflowers have a distinct UV reflection "bulls eye" pattern, its petals have a quite UV dark center and the outside part is quite UV bright around 365nm and all this gets nicely visible, also in simulated bee and butterfly vision.

I have written about that flower before HERE
 
Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos

Day Lilly hybride - Hemerocallis in reflected ultraviolet photography and simulated bee and butterfly vision II

Today shots of another Day Lilly - Hemerocallis hybride in reflected ultraviolet photography and simulated bee and butterfly vision. All shots were done at f8 in reflected ultraviolet photography using my "work horse" UV filter, the Baader-U filter, as well as my XBV filters for simulated bee and butterfly vision. Lens was a UV-Nikkor 105mm quartz fluorite lens. Light source was sunlight.

[click on image to see a larger one]

Human vision:
 

Reflected UV:
 

Simulated bee vision:
 

Simulated butterfly vision:
 

Quadriptych of human vision, UV, simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):
 

Day Lilly flowers have a distinct UV reflection, its petals have a quite UV dark center and the outside part is quite UV bright around 370nm and all this gets nicely visible, also in simulated bee and butterfly vision.

I have written about that flower before HERE
 
Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos

Thursday, June 21, 2018

Rose hybrid - Rosa sp. in reflected ultraviolet photography and simulated bee and butterfly vision

Today shots of a Rose hybrid - Rosa sp. in reflected ultraviolet photography and simulated bee and butterfly vision. All shots were done at f8 in reflected ultraviolet photography using my "work horse" UV filter, the Baader-U filter, as well as my XBV filters for simulated bee and butterfly vision. Lens was a UV-Nikkor 105mm quartz fluorite lens. Light source was sunlight.

[click on image to see a larger one]

Human vision:
 

Reflected UV:
 

Simulated butterfly vision:
 

Simulated bee vision:
 

Quadriptych of human vision, UV, simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):
 

This rose has just a little UV reflection around 380nm, its petals have some UV dark center and the outside part is a bit UV brighter around 380nm and all this gets nicely visible, also in simulated bee and butterfly vision.


Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos