Monday, April 5, 2021

Cliff maids - Lewisia cotyledon in reflected ultraviolet photography, simulated bee and butterfly vision V

Today in 2021 first closeup shots of a long blooming, perennial spring flower Cliff maids - Lewisia cotyledon in reflected ultraviolet photography and simulated bee and butterfly vision. All shots were done at f11 in reflected ultraviolet photography using my "work horse" UV filter, the Baader-U filter, as well as my XBV filters for simulated bee and butterfly vision. Lens was a UV-Nikkor 105mm quartz fluorite lens. Light source was Xenon light from my UV enhanced studio flash.

[click on image to see a larger one]

Human vision:
 

Reflected UV:
 

Simulated butterfly vision:
 

Simulated bee vision:
 

Quadriptych of human vision, UV, simulated bee and butterfly vision (left to right, top to bottom):
 

Lewisia has a visible UV pattern, its petal tips are UV bright around 385nm, its center is UV dark, so this gets quite nicely visible, also in simulated butterfly and bee vision.

I have written more about that flower HERE
 
Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos

Sunday, March 21, 2021

Moth orchid - Phalaenopsis in reflected ultraviolet photography and simulated butterfly and bee vision using a UV-Nikkor 105mm lens II

Today in March 2021 studio shots of a decorative flower, Moth orchid - Phalaenopsis in reflected ultraviolet photography using my "work horse" UV filter as well as simulated bee and butterfly vision  shot with my "work horse" UV-Nikkor f4.5/105mm quartz fluorite lens. UV filter used was the Baader-U filter, my "work horse" filter for reflected UV as well as my proprietary XBV filters for simulated bee and butterfly vision. All shots were done at f11. Light source used was a modified for high UV output Xenon flash. I have additionally used a 365nm UV LED for better focusing.

[click on image to see a larger one]

Human Vision (VIS):
 

Reflected UV (Baader-U):
 

Simulated Butterfly Vision:
 

Simulated Bee Vision:
 

Quadriptych of human vision, UV, simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):
 

This orchid has not a very specific UV pattern, its petals are UV reflective around 380nm, but its middle tip (column and gymnostemium) have a rather UV bright spot reflecting around 370nm which gets nicely visible.

The UV-Nikkor 105mm lens is known to be a very well working one, with a nice close up 1:2 focus capability from infinity up to 48cm (0.48 meter). Sharpness is very good and so is contrast, even from f4.5 onwards. With a Nikon PN-11 extension tube of 52.5mm length it reaches 1:1 (1x) magnification. It has the standard Nikon-F mount, and it covers full format sensors (41mm image diameter). It is defined to reach down to 190nm and up to 1300nm in near infrared; my measured transmission spectra of it may be seen here.

I have written more about this orchid HERE

Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos

Oncostele Wildcat 'Golden Red Star' in visible, reflected UV, simulated bee and butterfly vision using a UV-Nikkor 105mm lens V

Today in March 2021 even more shots of an Orchid hybride, Oncostele Wildcat 'Golden Red Star' in reflected ultraviolet photography as well as simulated bee and butterfly vision  shot with my "work horse" UV-Nikkor f4.5/105mm quartz fluorite lens. UV filter used was the Baader-U filter, my "work horse" filter for reflected UV as well as my proprietary XBV filters for simulated bee and butterfly vision. All shots were done at f11. Light source used was a modified for high UV output Xenon flash. I have additionally used a 365nm UV LED for better focusing.

[click on image to see a larger one]

Human Vision (VIS):
 

Reflected UV (Baader-U):
 

Simulated Butterfly Vision:
 

Simulated Bee Vision:
 

Quadriptych of human vision, UV, simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):
 

This orchid has a very specific UV pattern, its petals are very UV dark, but its lower petal lip shows on the lower center a very UV bright spot which gets nicely visible.

PS: The San Diego Botanic Garden will in their "World of Orchids" show April 3 - May 2, 2021 display these Oncostele "Wildcat" multispectral images, to explain how orchids and pollinators interact.

The UV-Nikkor 105mm lens is known to be a very well working one, with a nice close up 1:2 focus capability from infinity up to 48cm (0.48 meter). Sharpness is very good and so is contrast, even from f4.5 onwards. With a Nikon PN-11 extension tube of 52.5mm length it reaches 1:1 (1x) magnification. It has the standard Nikon-F mount, and it covers full format sensors (41mm image diameter). It is defined to reach down to 190nm and up to 1300nm in near infrared; my measured transmission spectra of it may be seen here.

I have written more about this orchid HERE

Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos

Wednesday, March 10, 2021

Oncostele Wildcat 'Golden Red Star' in visible, reflected UV, simulated bee and butterfly vision using a UV-Nikkor 105mm lens IV

Today in March 2021 more shots of an Orchid hybride, Oncostele Wildcat 'Golden Red Star' in reflected ultraviolet photography as well as simulated bee and butterfly vision  shot with my "work horse" UV-Nikkor f4.5/105mm quartz fluorite lens. UV filter used was the Baader-U filter, my "work horse" filter for reflected UV as well as my proprietary XBV filters for simulated bee and butterfly vision. All shots were done at f8. Light source used was a modified for high UV output Xenon flash. I have additionally used a 365nm UV LED for better focusing, (which unfortunately has influenced the white balance somewhat, in case you wonder).

[click on image to see a larger one]

Human Vision (VIS):
 

Reflected UV (Baader-U):
 

Simulated Butterfly Vision:
 

Simulated Bee Vision:
 

Quadriptych of human vision, UV, simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):
 

This orchid has a very specific UV pattern, its petals are very UV dark, but its lower petal lip shows on the lower center a very UV bright spot which gets nicely visible.

The UV-Nikkor 105mm lens is known to be a very well working one, with a nice close up 1:2 focus capability from infinity up to 48cm (0.48 meter). Sharpness is very good and so is contrast, even from f4.5 onwards. With a Nikon PN-11 extension tube of 52.5mm length it reaches 1:1 (1x) magnification. It has the standard Nikon-F mount, and it covers full format sensors (41mm image diameter). It is defined to reach down to 190nm and up to 1300nm in near infrared; my measured transmission spectra of it may be seen here.

I have written more about this orchid HERE

Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos

Oncostele Wildcat 'Golden Red Star' in visible, reflected UV, simulated bee and butterfly vision using a Jenoptik CoastalOpt® UV-VIS-IR 60 mm 1:4 APO Macro lens III

Today in March 2021 more shots of an Orchid hybride, Oncostele Wildcat 'Golden Red Star' in reflected ultraviolet photography as well as simulated bee and butterfly vision - but with a quite different lens, the Jenoptik CoastalOpt® UV-VIS-IR 60 mm 1:4 APO Macro quartz fluorite lens, which is on the scientific lens market for a few years now. UV filter used was the Baader-U filter, my "work horse" filter for reflected UV as well as my proprietary XBV filters for simulated bee and butterfly vision. All shots were done at f8. Light source used was a modified for high UV output Xenon flash. I have additionally used a 365nm UV LED for better focusing, (which unfortunately has influenced the white balance somewhat, in case you wonder).

[click on image to see a larger one]

Human Vision (VIS):
 

Reflected UV (Baader-U):
 

Simulated Butterfly Vision:
 

Simulated Bee Vision:
 

Quadriptych of human vision, UV, simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):
 

This orchid has a very specific UV pattern, its petals are very UV dark, but its lower petal lip shows on the lower center a very UV bright spot which gets nicely visible.

This 60mm lens is a rather well working one, with a nice close up focus capability from infinity up to 26cm (0.26 meter). Sharpness is quite good and so is its contrast, even wide open. It has a transmission waveband of 290nm - 1500nm and is apochromatic from 315nm - 1100nm. It is had an advanced broadband BBAR coating which increases transmission considerably and reduced flares; my measured transmission spectra of it may be seen here. It has a standard Nikon-F mount, and covers full format sensors (41mm diagonal). There have been reports of a UV hotspot, but the solution to it has been found by using a tight sunshade.

I have written more about this orchid HERE

Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos

Oncostele Wildcat 'Golden Red Star' in visible, reflected UV, simulated bee and butterfly vision using a Lavision 85mm lens II

Today in March 2021 again shots of an Orchid hybride, Oncostele Wildcat 'Golden Red Star' in reflected ultraviolet photography as well as simulated bee and butterfly vision - but with a quite different lens, the LAVISION f2.8/85mm quartz fluorite lens, which is rather new on the scientific lens market. UV filter used was the Baader-U filter, my "work horse" filter for reflected UV as well as my proprietary XBV filters for simulated bee and butterfly vision. All shots were done at f8. Light source used was a modified for high UV output Xenon flash. I have additionally used a 365nm UV LED for better focusing, (which unfortunately has influenced the white balance somewhat, in case you wonder).

[click on image to see a larger one]

Human Vision (VIS):
 

Reflected UV (Baader-U):
 

Simulated Butterfly Vision:
 

Simulated Bee Vision:
 

Quadriptych of human vision, UV, simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):
 

This orchid has a very specific UV pattern, its petals are very UV dark, but its lower petal lip shows on the lower center a very UV bright spot which gets nicely visible.

This 85mm lens seems to be a rather well working one, with a nice close up focus capability from infinity up to 40cm (0.4 meter). Sharpness is quite good and so is contrast, if stopped down to at least f4.5 that is. It has a standard Nikon-F mount, but only covers about APS-C format (approx. 30mm diameter) as it was designed to be used on amplified cameras, which usually require 25mm image diameter. It is defined to reach down to 200nm; my measured transmission spectra of it may be seen here.

I have written more about this orchid HERE

Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos

Wednesday, February 17, 2021

A few quartz flourite UV lenses on the bench for lens transmission measurements II

A few years ago I was taking transmission measurements of some special quartz-fluorite lenses for reflected UV photography. This included the then Coastal Optics UV-VIS-NIR Apo 60mm lens, after the merger now called Jenoptik CoastalOpt® UV-VIS-IR 60 mm 1:4 APO Macro. 

So since I just recently bought that CoastalOpt® lens, I measured it (amongst others) with my newer spectrometric setup and compared my results with their published data. Surprisingly enough, my older and newer measurements of that CoastalOpt® 60mm Apo lens correlate very well - but not with their now officially published data on their site which shows much lower transmission values. Their formerly published data however showed much better spectral transmission, which correlated well with my own measurements.

[click on image to see a larger one]

Here in comparison the former (white) and now published data (magenta) superimposed:

My own measurements back then were these (amongst some other lenses):


[validity: approx 310 - 750nm]

and my newer current measurements (reaching deeper into UV) are these:

[validity: approx 300 - 750nm]

The differences in transmission of both my measurements are rather small. It is beyond my understanding how these new and quite different measurements (about 20% less) happened; I am just wondering why such an excellent lens is not represented well enough....

I have written about this lens before HERE.

Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos