Sunday, January 15, 2023

Moth orchid - Phalaenopsis in reflected ultraviolet photography and simulated butterfly and bee vision using a UV-Nikkor 105mm lens IV

Today in January 2023 some studio shots of a well known decorative flower, a white Moth orchid - Phalaenopsis in reflected ultraviolet photography using my "work horse" UV filter as well as simulated bee and butterfly vision  shot with my "work horse" UV-Nikkor f4.5/105mm quartz fluorite lens. UV filter used was the Baader-U filter, my "work horse" filter for reflected UV as well as my proprietary XBV filters for simulated bee and butterfly vision. All shots were done at f11. Light source used was a Xenon flash modified for high UV output. 

[click on image to see a larger one]

Human Vision (VIS):
 

Reflected UV (Baader-U):
 

Simulated Butterfly Vision:
 

Simulated Bee Vision:
 

Quadriptych of human vision, UV, simulated bee and butterfly vision (left to right, top to bottom):
 

This orchid has not a very specific UV pattern, its petals are UV reflective around 380nm, but its middle tip (column and gymnostemium) have a rather UV bright spot reflecting around 370nm surrounded by an UV-dark area which gets nicely visible.

The UV-Nikkor 105mm lens is known to be a very well working one for multispectral imaging w/o focus shift, with a nice 1:2 close up focusing capability from infinity up to 48cm (0.48 meter). Sharpness is very good and so is its contrast, even from f4.5 onwards. With a Nikon PN-11 extension tube of 52.5mm length it reaches 1:1 (1x) magnification. It has the standard Nikon-F mount, and it covers full format sensors (41mm image diameter). It is defined to reach down to 190nm and up to 1300nm in near infrared; my measured transmission spectra of it may be seen here.

I have written more about this orchid HERE

Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos

Moth orchid - Phalaenopsis in reflected ultraviolet photography and simulated butterfly and bee vision using a UV-Nikkor 105mm lens III

Today in January 2023 some studio shots of a well known decorative flower, a yellow-orange Moth orchid - Phalaenopsis in reflected ultraviolet photography using my "work horse" UV filter as well as simulated bee and butterfly vision  shot with my "work horse" UV-Nikkor f4.5/105mm quartz fluorite lens. UV filter used was the Baader-U filter, my "work horse" filter for reflected UV as well as my proprietary XBV filters for simulated bee and butterfly vision. All shots were done at f11. Light source used was a Xenon flash modified for high UV output. 

[click on image to see a larger one]

Human Vision (VIS):
 

Reflected UV (Baader-U):
 

Simulated Butterfly Vision:
 

Simulated Bee Vision:
 

Quadriptych of human vision, UV, simulated bee and butterfly vision (left to right, top to bottom):
 

This orchid has not a very specific UV pattern, its petals are UV reflective around 380nm, but its middle tip (column and gymnostemium) have a rather UV bright spot reflecting around 370nm surrounded by an UV-dark area which gets nicely visible.

The UV-Nikkor 105mm lens is known to be a very well working one for multispectral imaging w/o focus shift, with a nice 1:2 close up focusing capability from infinity up to 48cm (0.48 meter). Sharpness is very good and so is its contrast, even from f4.5 onwards. With a Nikon PN-11 extension tube of 52.5mm length it reaches 1:1 (1x) magnification. It has the standard Nikon-F mount, and it covers full format sensors (41mm image diameter). It is defined to reach down to 190nm and up to 1300nm in near infrared; my measured transmission spectra of it may be seen here.

I have written more about this orchid HERE

Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos

Wednesday, January 11, 2023

Winter Jasmine - Jasminum Nudiflorum in reflected ultraviolet photography and simulated bee and butterfly vision VI

Today in 2023 shots of a beautiful winter flower, a Winter Jasmine - Jasminum nudiflorum in reflected ultraviolet photography using my "work horse" UV filter, the Baader-U filter, as well as in simulated bee and butterfly vision using my propriatary XBV filters. All shots were done at f11. Lens was a UV-Nikkor 105mm quartz fluorite lens. Light source was a modified Xenon flash.

[click on image to see a larger one]

Human vision:
 

Reflected ultraviolet (UV):
 

Simulated bee vision:
 

Simulated butterfly vision:
 

Quadriptych of human vision, ultraviolet, simulated bee and butterfly vision (left to right, top to bottom):
 

This flower shows a very prominent and strong UV reflection around 365nm on its petals, but its center is UV-dark, and all this gets nicely visible, also in simulated bee and butterfly vision.
 
Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...


I have previously written about this flower HERE

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos

Friday, July 22, 2022

Common Purslane - Portulaca oleracea in reflected ultraviolet photography and simulated bee and butterfly vision

Today in 2022 shots of a beautiful flower, now offered as an ornamental + edible plant, a Common Purslane - Portulaca oleracea in reflected ultraviolet photography using my "work horse" UV filter, the Baader-U filter, as well as in simulated bee and butterfly vision using my XBV filters. All shots were done at f11. Lens was a UV-Nikkor 105mm quartz fluorite lens. Light source was a modified Xenon flash.

[click on image to see a larger one]

Human vision:
 

Reflected ultraviolet (UV):
 

Simulated butterfly vision:
 

Simulated bee vision:
 

Quadriptych of human vision, ultraviolet, simulated bee and butterfly vision (left to right, top to bottom):
 

This flower shows a very prominent and strong UV reflection around 365nm, and all this gets nicely visible, also in simulated bee and butterfly vision.
 
Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos

Sunday, June 26, 2022

Black-eyed Susan - Rudbeckia hirta in reflected ultraviolet photography and simulated bee and butterfly vision XVII

Today in 2022 shots of a beautiful flower, originating from the USA Prairie, a Black-eyed Susan - Rudbeckia hirta in reflected ultraviolet photography using my "work horse" UV filter, the Baader-U filter, as well as in simulated bee and butterfly vision using my XBV filters. All shots were done at f11. Lens was a UV-Nikkor 105mm quartz fluorite lens. Light source was a modified Xenon flash.

[click on image to see a larger one]

Human vision:
 

Reflected ultraviolet (UV):
 

Simulated butterfly vision:
 

Simulated bee vision:
 

Quadriptych of human vision, ultraviolet, simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):
 

This flower shows a very prominent UV bullseye pattern, as its petal tips are very UV bright (around 365nm) and its center is very UV dark, and all this gets nicely visible, also in simulated bee and butterfly vision.

I have previously written about that flower HERE
 
Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos

Monday, June 13, 2022

"Wandelmut" Exhibit at Museum Sinclair House, Bad Homburg

There is currently an exhibit in Germany at the Museum Sinclair-House, Bad Homburg within the "Wandelmut" (willingness to change) series, which has some of my multispectral works on display. Visible here is a Rudbeckia hirta flower in human vision, simulated bee and butterfly vision, showing the "landing platform" only bees and butterflies can see, as they have the ability to see ultraviolet light (300-400nm), which we humans cannot see.


(Human vision vs. simulated Bee + Butterfly vision; left to right) 

I have written about that Rudbeckia hirta flower HERE before,

Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos



 

Wednesday, April 13, 2022

Nectar Mimicry at Lewisia cotylodon made visible using multispectral photography II

Today more about Nectar Mimicry. This Spring 2022 I got a bright white, long blooming, perennial flower Cliff maids - Lewisia cotyledon and took photos in reflected ultraviolet photography and simulated bee and butterfly vision. And it was in 2021 when I had discovered a highly reflective ring in visible and especially reflected UV photographyI I then talked to Prof. Klaus Lunau, whom I know since years, and he revealed that he has just recently discovered and published about this Nectar Mimicry!

This clearly visible UV reflecting ring, formed by those shiny petals which is especially visible in reflected UV had been discovered by Prof. (em) Klaus Lunau of the University of Duesseldorf, Germany and he had published about that in NATURE 2020 here: Lunau, K., Ren, ZX., Fan, XQ. et al. Nectar mimicry: a new phenomenon. Sci Rep 10, 7039 (2020). https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-63997-3

All these shots were done at f11 in reflected ultraviolet photography using my "work horse" UV filter, the Baader-U filter, as well as my XBV filters for simulated bee and butterfly vision. Lens was a UV-Nikkor 105mm quartz fluorite lens. Light source was Xenon light from my UV enhanced studio flash.

[click on image to see a larger one]

Human vision:
 

Reflected UV:
 

Simulated butterfly vision:
 

Simulated bee vision:
 

Quadriptych of human vision, UV, simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):
 

Lewisia has a visible UV pattern, its petal tips are UV bright around 385nm, its center is UV dark, so this and this highly reflecting ring structure gets quite nicely visible, also in simulated butterfly and bee vision.

I have written more about that flower HERE
 
Stay tuned, more will follow on that fascinating subject...

More info on this very interesting field may be found on my site http://www.pbase.com/kds315/uv_photos